Chronicles of a blind Nigerian

CHRONICLES OF A BLIND NIGERIAN (1)

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By Demola Adeleke

 

Intro:

 

Hi friends, it’s my pleasure to have you here. My name is Demola Adeleke, a final year student of Mass Communication at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, in Enugu State, Nigeria. I am a blind Nigerian who, in spite of his eyes closed, has chosen to share his stories with you.

 

Hence, simply see me as a beggar, one who begs, not for alms, but for your readership and contribution on this series. In this column ‘Chronicles of a blind Nigerian’, I shall be giving you an insight into my world, how it feels to live without eye-sight and also share the experiences of other blind persons with you. I will be your host on this column; therefore, you are welcome to my world!

 

This first episode will only usher you to how I lost my sight and became a blind Nigerian, subsequent episodes will give you a better knowledge of my world (the blind world).

 

 

Clears throat…

 

The love between my parents was what converged them in their matrimonial bed on one of the days in the early 1990s and after some time of love making, I appeared in their lives in form of pregnancy. Just like any pregnancy will, I grew in my mum’s womb with the passage of time and in a lapse of 10 months, I was launched into this beautiful world in the male sex.

 

Being preceded by strictly two female siblings gave my arrival a special attention from my parents; you know, the African custom of having preference for male children, so the care from family members was much and every stage of my upbringing experienced special parental adoration.

 

Life was worth living, the feeling of being loved by family stimulated the butterflies in my tummy, I was a happy child with lots of dreams, I wanted to become a doctor, lawyer, engineer and driver. I wanted to become everything at once, in as much as the spirit of infancy was the one suggesting professions to me.

 

I had a blind spot about life and the possible challenges in it, thus, I was convinced that it was on the bed of roses I would forever lay my back. But Conversely, I got a shocking twist of events in my life at the age of 7 when I had a decline in my sightedness.

 

Or what could have happened when my fellow classmates, with the same size of eyeballs as me; when seated at the same location, would clearly see the contents on the chalkboard but for me, the writings were all a blur. Oops! But thought such comes only with old age infirmities, as evident in my grandfather who could barely see. So why me? A 7-year-old boy whose eyes hadn’t seen anything yet.

 

“Life was worth living, the feeling of being loved by family stimulated the butterflies in my tummy, I was a happy child with lots of dreams, I wanted to become a doctor, lawyer, engineer and driver. I wanted to become everything at once, in as much as the spirit of infancy was the one suggesting professions to me.”

Shout-out to my childish brains which rendered me unreasonable not to have considered my deteriorating sight a threat to my welfare, because with every roll of days, my eye condition blurred the line between bad and worse. So little by little, I found myself in a situation where I had to copy notes from friends and not directly from the board. 

#Tears Dropping…

Sometimes, I wish I could just travel back to my childhood to make some corrections but sadly, there’s no second chance in life.

I didn’t mention my defective eye-sight to my parents at all, ask me why and I will tell you I don’t know either. Perhaps because I was still a kid who took interest in only eating, sleeping and playing. Every other thing aside the aforesaid activities, had no section in my daily thinking.

Then one day, my class teacher who might have spent some time observing me, asked why I was always looking into my friend’s books to copy my notes and not the chalkboard. With the fear of being beaten for not having an answer to his question, I tremblingly explained to him how the writings on the board appeared as a blur to me when viewed.

“Sometimes, I wish I could just travel back to my childhood to make some corrections but sadly, there’s no second chance in life.”

He advised that I should tell my parents about it and which I promised him I would, but before getting home that afternoon, I had already forgotten. So time continued to roll by while my sight continued to aggravate. In order not to bore you with history, my parents finally knew about their son’s predicament in school through the headmaster and with that, my life took a new turn, a turn of going for appointments in the eye clinic.

Appointments appointments; everytime appointment in the eye clinic, and for my mum, she was never tired of bringing me to the clinic (A mother’s love for her only son).

In my mother’s eye, I could see depression in it. I knew she was troubled, of course any mother will. But I knew her main fear, it was waking up one day to see her Demola become blind. For me, I was only feeling inconvenient for having to skip most of my Monday classes for an appointment at the clinic. And if at all I felt bad as a result of my waning sight, then it would be because a classmate insulted me with it.

Money, energy and prayers of my parents didn’t help bring back my sight. After 9 years of frequenting both hospitals and prayer grounds, I eventually lost my sight to glaucoma in 2009.

My friends and siblings were so sad, my parents were sadder and being the bearer of the problem, Iwas the saddest of all. My God! Why me? Is it that my parents’ prayers were not enough? What of the energy and stress my mother put into making sure I went for all my appointments at the clinic? My dad’s expenses on my sight is incalculable, so why didn’t you crown his effort?! God, I don’t deserve to be blind! I cried to him that year.

But today, I’ve had a totally different orientation about life. So without sight, dreams can still be accomplished?

“But today, I’ve had a totally different orientation about life. So without sight, dreams can still be accomplished?”

 

 

13 Comments

  1. Sweetheart, you just made me cry again.

    And yes, your life is a great answer to your question. Without sight, dreams can be accomplished.

    Nice episode from you

  2. Yemi Egbebi Reply

    Words only cannot portray how dejected I felt after reading this article written by a marvelous blind orator Demola Adeleke.

    To me you are an inspiration and also an impeller that do instigates me to dream big and to aim higher..

    Am happy to have you not as a blind boy the wicked souls methamorphosized you into but a source of inspiration to numerous souls.

    The day we became friends, my instincts presumed immediately that I have chose the right partner regardless of your visual impairment.

    I love and respect your self-orientation..Bless you bro

  3. Yemi Egbebi Reply

    Words only cannot portray how dejected I felt after reading this article written by a marvelous blind orator Demola Adeleke.

    To me you are an inspiration and also an impeller that do instigates me to dream big and to aim higher..

    Am happy to have you not as a blind boy the wicked souls methamorphosized you into but a source of inspiration to numerous souls.

    The day we became friends, my instincts presumed immediately that I have chose the right partner regardless of your visual impairment.
    For those that are weeping over this, I will urge you to save your tears till his celebration moment.

    I love and respect your self-orientation..Bless you bro

  4. I barely know this guy ooo…but i read most of his articles on myunndreams and then am marvelled at how creative he is in his writing..trust me, his choice of words are awesome….i love you bro…shine on..u are truly an inspiration to this generation

  5. It is really a heart touching experience but God will see you through. More grace to you

  6. The tear keeps falling uncontrollably, one thing I know is that our God is never asleep, he knows what is best,believe it or not ,he will answer u at the elevenths hour,u may be physically blind but u av the insight of ten people.u ar truly an aspiration, keep it up!!!!

  7. Navida Chimdinma Reply

    As its always said… Ability in disability… Ur a star Demmy, keep shining

  8. Wish am a healer… Demmy you deserve all the attention, care love and encouragement not for pity but for who you are to become… Am short of words demmy but trust me,, heaven will hear your cry

  9. UGWU CHINAGOROM JOSEPH Reply

    This is absolutely touching. You once stated, in my presence, that “you are blind in the eyes, not in the Brain”. I fell in love with you after the statement. You’re a walking miracle and the hand of God is upon you. Cheers!

  10. MGBENKA CHIEMERIE CASMIR Reply

    Demola adeleke, a wise man once said that the archer is known by his abilities–not his arrows. Demola, you have no arrows but you have the ability. you lack nothing. Reading your articles has forced a change on my orientation of the blind. i hit the hay by 3am last night, what was i doing? reading your articles in as much as i could not disentangle myself from the intriguing content of those articles. i am trying to say in essence that you are a prolific writer. i just don’t know what else to type, i think i have to hit the hay now.

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